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From the files of: Kathleen M. Smith

The Artillery Officer
Whitecar, George C.
1st. Lt. 71st Pennsylvania. Infantry. Co. D.

George was born in Philadelphia, on June 23, 1841. He was the son of Matilda Vandegrift and Joseph T. Whitecar, and a great grandson of the Revolutionary Soldier, John Miller.

He enlisted in the army on July1, 1861. He was 20 years old and described as being; 6' tall, with gray eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion. He listed his occupation as a clerk.

George's name appears on the Pennsylvania. Monument, on the Gettysburg Battlefield. He received his training at Camp Oregon, just outside of Washington D. C. and was assigned to the artillery unit of the 71st. The 71st Penna. was part of Major General Hancock's,s II Corps, Webb's Brigade, General John Gibbons Division, They participated in many of the battles that took place in Virginia. George's first battle would be 1st Bull Run ,and he would fight at 2nd Bull Run ( Manassas ), Antietam, the 7 Da y Peninsula Campaign, Gettysburg, and Wilderness. In October1861, after the 1st Bull Run battle George was promoted to sergeant, and in Feb.1862, after Antietam, he was promoted to 2nd. lt. In April 1863,he was promoted to 1st Lt., and assigned to Co. D. which he would command through the Battle of Gettysburg.

On September 17, 1862, at the battle of Antietam, he was shot in the right leg. while he was recovering in a hospital near Washington D. C. he became ill with dysentery, and was granted 30 days leave to return home to Philadelphia., to seek treatment from a Private Physician. On July 2 1863, after a long march from Virginia, the II Corps. arrived at Gettysburg in the early morning hours, and were positioned between the I and III Corps,during the battle of the Wheatfield, Cemetery Hill, and Culp's.s Hill. During the morning of 3rd,the 71st., was positioned along Cemetery Ridge, at Bloody AngleBloody Angle". it was directly at the 71st., that Confederate Artillery fire was aimed, and it was the 71st., at which Pickett's Charge was directed later in the day. During the night of the 2nd and into the mourning hours of the 3rd the fierce fighting between Union & Conf ederate troops had finally taken possession of the hill. The firing had ceased and the men were able to tend to the wounded and to rest and eat.

On July 2, 1863, after a long march from Virginia, the II Corps arrived at Gettysburg in the early morning hours, and was positioned between the I and II Corps during the Battle of the Wheatfield, Cemetery Hill and Culp's Hill. During the morning of the 3rd, the 71st was positioned along Cemetery Ridge, at the "Bloody Angle". It was directly at the 71st that Confederate artillery fire was aimed, and it was the 71st at which Pickett's Charge was directed later in the day. During the night of the 2nd and into the morning hours of the 3rd, the fierce fighting between Union and Confederate troops had raged until about 9:30 on the morning of the 3rd, when the Union troops had finally taken possession of the hill. The firing had ceased and the men were able to tend to the wounded and to rest and eat.

About 1 PM, on July 3, 1863, Confederate artillery on Seminary Ridge began firing on the Union troops on Cemetery Ridge. The Union soldiers were caught napping and it took about 10 minutes before they began to return fire. The fierce cannonading continued until about 3 PM, when the Confederate soldiers rose up from their cover and began charging across the field. Pickett's Charge was a disaster for the Confederate troops, they took heavy rifle fire from the Union regiments on Culp's Hill, and the 71st's artillery fire was directly in their faces. The battle was over by about 4 PM. George was wounded during this time, when he was shot in the right arm, and hit with shrapnel from and exploding caisson. Although during the battle many Union soldiers had begun to abandon their positions, and had to be threatened with death by and from the swords of their officers to return to their positions, the artillery of the 71st was credited with standing at their guns throughout the battle. later in the night George was taken to a field hospital.

About 1 pm, on July 3, 1863, Confederate artillery on Seminary Ridge, began firing on the Union troops on Cemetery Ridge. The Union soldiers were caught napping, and it took about 10 minutes before they began to return fire. The fierce cannonading continued until about 3 pm, when the Confederate solders rose up from their cover and began charging across the field. Pickett's Charge was a disaster for the confederate troops, they took heavy rifle fire from the Union regiments on Culp's Hill, and the 71st.'s Pa. artillery fire directly into their faces. The battle was over by about 4 pm.

George survived his wounds and the medical treatment and after a leave of absence he returned to his regiment and was promoted to Captain in Feb.1864 , and assigned to recruiting duty,for about 2 months. He then returned to his regiment and was promoted to Captain in feb. 1864 , and assigned to recruiting duty, for about 2 months, He then returned to regular duty, and was at the battle of the wilderness, in May 1864 . He was discharged in july 1864, but he then enlisted in the 3rd U. S.Veterans Volunteer Infantry, from which he was discharged in july 1866,at fort Snelling, Minn.

On December 26, 1864, George married Harriet E. Dick and they resided in Philadelphia., and raised 6 daughters and 3 sons. George began a career as maintenance engineer, George's right arm was partially paralyzed, and in 1871, he applied for a military pension, which was granted.
In 1906, George was receiving a pension of $8.00 per month and in march of that year he requested an increase. Affidavits from his doctors state that his arm was almost totally paralyzed due to increasing nerve damage, which frequently interfered with his ability to work. George's health was deteriorating and he was later placed in theNational Soldier's Home for Veterans in Knoxville, Tennessee, where he died on July 31, 1911 at the age of 70 years. His cause of death was listed in gangrene of the right foot. George may be buried in the Mt Moriah Cemetery in Philadelphia., as his family ha d a plot there.


Research by Kathleen M. Smith
National Archives, Washington DC
Vandergrift Genealogy by Mervine





Family of Garrett Vandegriff
Information from Paul Vandergriff and Joy Reynolds

Name: Garrett VANDEGRIFF
Father: Abraham VANDERGRIFT (4 Jul-1748)
Mother: Martje (Mary) VAN SANDT (-bef 3 Mar 1749)
Birth abt 1737 in PA?
Death bef 1800 in Hillsbourgh District, Wake, NC (age 63)
Burial in , Wake, NC
Marriages/Children
1. Sarah DELAPLAN 16 Jun 1763 in Philadelphia, Bucks, PA (age 26)
Children Garrett VANDEGRIFF (abt 1764-bet 1840 and 1850)
Leonard VANDEGRIFF (abt 1766-)
Peter VANDEGRIFF (abt 1770-aft 1850)
Christopher VANDEGRIFF (bet 1773 and 1784-)
Elsworth VANDEGRIFF (abt 1774-16 Aug 1811)
Jacob VANDEGRIFF (abt 1778-)
Archibald VANDEGRIFF (abt 1780-)
John VANDEGRIFF (abt 1782-)
Sally VANDEGRIFF (abt 1788-)
Thenia VANDEGRIFF (abt 1792-)
Mary VANDEGRIFF (abt 1796-)
Nancy VANDEGRIFF (abt 1798-)


Family of Jacob Vandergriff (1740)

Name: Jacob VANDERGRIFF
Father: Leonard VANDERGRIFF (1718-1769)
Mother: Lydia UNKNOWN (-)
Individual Facts
Birth abt 1740 in Delaware
Death abt 1828 in Anderson Co., Tennessee (age 88)
Marriages/Children
1. Sarah UNKNOWN
Children John VANDERGRIFF (-)
Jacob VANDERGRIFT (1758/63-1848) m. Jane ? 1787 Wilkes County, NC
Ann VANDERGRIFF (abt 1764-) m. William Roberts
Gilbert VANDERGRIFF (abt 1768-)
Sarah VANDERGRIFF (-)
Rebecca VANDERGRIFF (-)
Hannah VANDERGRIFF (abt 1786-) m. John Beeler
Garrett VANDERGRIFF (1787-) m. Mary Ann Rasbury
Leonard VANDERGRIFF (-) m. Sarah (Sally) Roberts

Page 7
September/October 1997

From the Files of.......
Bill DeCoursey

1657
Tryntje HENRICKS, widow of Cornelius COURSEN petitioned the Orphan Masters on, 19 Sept 1657, for guardianship of her children Cornelius, Peter, and Hendrick.
See Register of the Minutes of the Orphan Masters of New Amsterdam, p.40; Percival Ullman, pp.18-23.

1657 Frederick LUBBERTSEN married, between 17 Aug and Oct 13 1657, to Tryntje HENRICKSE, widow of Cors PIETERSEN VROOM (deCOURCY). LUBBERTSEN, born ca.1609, had come from Amsterdam, Holland with his dau., Rebecca, and first wife, Styntje HENDRICKSE, who, according to some, was the sister of Tryntje
HENDRICKS. LUBBERTSEN was a sailor and associate of Arendt and Dirck CORSSE STAM and worked with Dirck CORSSE under Kieft's administration.
See Orville Corson, p.39-41THE BERGEN FAMILY, pp.126-129,126n
Rosalie Fellows Bailey, DUTCH SYSTEMS IN FAMILY NAMING (Reprint No. 12, from the NATIONAL GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY QUARTERLY - March 1953, Dec. 1953), p.10.

1657 Frederick LUBBERTSEN and his first wife, Styntje HENDRICKSE lived at what is now the northwest corner of Maiden Lane and Pearl St. on Staten Island. They were the maternal grandparents of Maritje van de GRIFT, who became the wife of Cors Pietersen's eldest son, Capt. Cornelis CORSSEN. This hous
e was sold about 1657, by Fredrick LUBBERTSEN, to Maria Du TRIEUX (widow of Cornelis VOLKERTSEN) and her second husband, Jan PEEKE, who occupied the house until about 1660, when they sold it to Cornelis CLOPPER.
Orville Corson, THREE HUNDRED YEARS WITH THE CORSON FAMILIES IN AMERICA (1939), v.1, pp.33-34.